Broker Dealer Annual Audit: Checklist of What you Need to Prepare

Changes to the annual audit require broker-dealers to be proactive in being prepared. Working closing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) reviews broker-dealers closely to ensure compliance with rules and regulations. Failure to comply may result in heavy fines or a disruption in business.

Owners of brokerage firms need to actively communicate the importance of following proper procedures to employees. Individuals are entrusting you with their finances. Any type of mishandling of funds or failure to follow rules damages your brokerage firm’s reputation. If you are unsure of the recent changes or need answers, contact your brokerage firm’s CPA to guide you through the requirements for the annual audit.

Basic Checklist to Prepare for Your Broker-Dealer Audit

Ensuring your brokerage firm is compliant is the main purpose of the FINRA annual broker-dealer audit. The auditor will check different aspects of your daily operations. Prior to the audit, prepare your employees. Ensure your team is following the rules and regulations in compliance with the SEC and the FINRA requirements.

The auditor will carefully examine your brokerage firm’s daily operating procedures. Having your financial statements, company’s logs, and daily monitoring records prepared is critical. The auditor checks your records to ensure the proper handling of your clients’ money. Before the audit day arrives, gather all the necessary documentation, including:

  • License: In your annual audit, the broker-dealer will check your license. Do not allow your license to lapse for any reason. An up to date license ensures your brokerage firm is aware of the industry’s changing requirements and guidelines.
  • Financial Statements and Reports: Current financial statements to provide documentation for the proper handling of investments.
  • Customer Accounts: Review the customer account records to ensure all the information is current. Having employees update addresses, telephone numbers, tax identification numbers, and personal details should be an ongoing process throughout the year to eliminate the possibility of errors.
  • Compensation Records: Provide compensation records to verify proper procedures.
  • Communication: Provide documentation of emails or letters regarding SEC or FINRA communication.
  • Complaints: The auditor will analyze your records to ensure all procedures follow fair trade practices. Provide the auditor with resolutions regarding any type of complaint. Failing to be aggressive in fixing or handling complaints may harm your brokerage firm’s ability to conduct business.
  • Employee Records: A current list of managers who handle the daily transactions of higher funded investments.

If you are uncertain about the exact records, contact your firm’s CPA. Your CPA will be able to provide you with insight. The broker-dealer audit review of the documents is from an independent source. Any errors or failure to provide the current statements or documentation will delay the auditing process. Being prepared and professional at the time of the audit is critical.

Assessing the documents for misrepresentation, the auditor will carefully examine all materials to identify risks. Keeping accurate records of your customers, employees, and daily transactions will help minimize the chances of failing the audit. Costly fines, damaged reputation, and delay in business can result from an inaccurate audit review. Keep in mind, providing more documentation and records is better than too little.  If your firm is looking for a CPA, contact Ernst Wintter & Associates.

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